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Entertainment

Artists use 3D scanning and CNC milling to create lifelike wooden statues of Swiss personalities

The Schweizerholz (Swiss wood) initiative and the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment have launched a campaign called ‘Woodvetia’ to raise awareness about the advantages of using wood, a biodegradable and eco-friendly material, in construction and furniture production. The motto of the campaign is: “Smelling wood, feeling wood and experiencing wood.”


A REVOLUTION IN THE PROP AND MOVIE INDUSTRY?

WHAT FILM- AND PROP-MAKERS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT 3D PRINTING

From day one, the movie industry has tried to create motion pictures in which everything looks as realistic as possible. Filmmakers and directors have been using a combination of diverse camera tricks, special effects, but also props to make the audience believe what they see is real.

3D PRINTING HELPS TO RETURN A SILVERBACK GORILLA BACK TO LIFE

There are several cases where modelers, designers, artists and restorers come to certain limits when creating a piece of work. Particularly when it comes to the creation of bigger, complex and detailed pieces of art. Traditional methods are proving not only to be more time intensive but often times also very cost intensive. Through a combination of new 3D printing technology and traditional artwork, designers have the possibility “to create efficiencies and help artists render their concepts, from start to finish”, says Rop Arps (Tacoma News Tribune, 2016).

Massivit 3D Printing Technologies Ltd. uses state-of-the-art UV-LED technology for 3D printing.

Massivit continually develops innovative 3D printing products that grow its customers’ businesses in exciting new ways. Massivit utilizes the latest LED technology to offer an unlimited range of creative super-sized 3D displays, which are rocking the world of advertising, entertainment and retail.

The Sky's the Limit with Roland 3D Scanning and Printing Technology

Sculptor Andrew Werby has been in on the merging of art and technology from the beginning. In the late '70s and early '80s, he and several like-minded artists began the Juxtamorphic art movement, using moulds to capture natural forms and manipulating them by cutting wax castings apart, then welding them together in new configurations. In the 90s, Werby went digital, using early versions of Photoshop® and, later, Rhinoceros®, to combine objects in 2D and 3D in a variety of styles and media, creating synthesised works of art.


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