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Last updateWed, 21 Feb 2018 9am
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Automotive

Additive Manufacturing Delivers Prototype Perfection at Racing Speeds

Innovative technology puts Williams Martini Racing’s Formula 1 Team on the podium

Whether measured by the accolades of adoring fans, the distribution of prize money, or the eternal passion for driving full throttle, success and speed count in Formula 1 as they do in no other sport. Having won nine constructor titles and seven driver world championships, it is fair to say that the Williams Martini Racing F1 Team understands its craft. The fact that speed is also important off the track can be seen in the racing team's development department. There, the engineers have successfully applied additive manufacturing using EOS technology to construct exterior parts of the front wing's assembly for their 2016 racing car.


STUDENTS AT UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCES RAVENSBURG-WEINGARTEN 'DESIGN FOR ADDITIVE' WITH FIRST-OF-ITS-KIND 3D PRINTED SELF-BALANCING SCOOTER

Tasked with optimizing a digital product life cycle for customized production, students learn how to ‘think additively’ by designing self-balancing scooter development process around additive technology

Production of first self-balancing scooter prototype reduced from four weeks to four days with Stratasys additive technologies, equating to time-savings of 85%

Self-balancing scooter to be displayed at formnext in Frankfurt, November 14-17 in Hall 3.1, Stand F40

Additive manufacturing helps reduce lead-time and production costs of self-driving bus Olli

American vehicle manufacturing company Local Motors is disrupting the automotive industry with the Olli, the first self-driving vehicle powered by IBM’s Watson IoT technology. Since the launch of the autonomous shuttle in June 2016, Olli (originally named Berlino) has taken around 850 trips and transported 1500 passengers safely.


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